A Faithful Reminder

Bradford_pear_tree_blossomsOh, how I love this time of year! God is rousing His creation, tuning His orchestra, showcasing bits of beauty—each in their own time. The Creator of all lifts His hands and the daffodils and Bradford pears burst to life, lifting their respective yellow and white-flowered praises for anyone who has an ear to listen.

The Dogwoods are teasing, if you think that’s something, wait for me! Azaleas pause in quiet expectation. Hydrangeas and crepe myrtles strain with joy as they wait for their turns to glorify the Creator.

Oh, the loveliness! 

And while popping my daily antihistamine and soaking in joyful displays of color, I’m reminded of something: My God is faithful.

The winter may have felt long and never-ending but God’s beauty is a reminder that He is here and in control. 

When life seems brittle and barren, God is at work. His hand moves and works in our livesdaffodils2—even when we can’t see or understand.

The beginning splashes of spring remind us—He is here, ever-present and ever-able to restore, renew, and recharge us for His purposes.

Praise Him for His faithfulness! 

 

Great is Thy Faithfulness

Great is Thy faithfulness, O God my Father;
There is no shadow of turning with Thee;
Thou changest not, Thy compassions, they fail not;
As Thou hast been, Thou forever will be.

Great is Thy faithfulness!
Great is Thy faithfulness!
Morning by morning new mercies I see.
All I have needed Thy hand hath provided;
Great is Thy faithfulness, Lord, unto me!

Summer and winter and springtime and harvest,
Sun, moon and stars in their courses above
Join with all nature in manifold witness
To Thy great faithfulness, mercy and love.

Pardon for sin and a peace that endureth
Thine own dear presence to cheer and to guide;
Strength for today and bright hope for tomorrow,
Blessings all mine, with ten thousand beside!

Great is Thy faithfulness!
Great is Thy faithfulness!
Morning by morning new mercies I see.
All I have needed Thy hand hath provided;
Great is Thy faithfulness, Lord, unto me!

The Story behind the hymn:

“Thomas Obadiah Chisolm (1866-1960) had a difficult adult life. His health was so fragile that there were periods of time when he was confined to bed, unable to work.
After coming to Christ at age 27, Thomas found great comfort in the Scriptures, and in the fact that God was faithful to be his strength in time of illness and provide his needs. Lamentations 3:22-23 was one of his favorite scriptures: “It is of the Lord’s mercies that we are not consumed, because His compassions fail not. They are new every morning: great is Thy faithfulness.”

While away from home on a missions trip, Thomas often wrote to one of his good friends, William Runyan, a relatively unknown musician. Several poems were exchanged in these letters. Runyan found one of Williams’ poems so moving that he decided to compose a musical score to accompany the lyrics. Great is Thy Faithfulness was published in 1923.

For several years, the hymn got very little recognition, until it was discovered by a Moody Bible Institute professor who loved it so much and requested it sung so often at chapel services, that the song became the unofficial theme song of the college.

It was not until 1945 when George Beverly Shea began to sing Great is Thy Faithfulness at the Billy Graham evangelistic crusades, that the hymn was heard around the world.

Thomas Chisolm died in 1960 at age 94. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 1,200 poems and hymns including O To Be Like Thee and Living for Jesus.” (Excerpt from ShareFaith.com)

 

 I will sing of the mercies of the Lord forever: with my mouth will I make known Thy faithfulness to all generations. (Psalm 89:1)

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